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POP INTERVIEW: Firebird Chef Paul Joseph Brings Russian Food to Midtown West Manhattan

Chef Paul Joseph takes NYC diners on a culinary journey.

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Chef Paul Joseph“My change of career came when I’d realized that I was doing the same thing day in and day out, crunching numbers as an accountant,” says Paul Joseph, the 41-year old Haitian chef. “One day, I took a part time job at a very unusual place for a future chef to start a career in culinary arts. From that moment, my first cooking job, I knew there was no turning back for me. I became fascinated with my work as a cook and my culinary environment. “This is it, this right here: cooking makes me very happy, filled me with joy by doing what I’m doing” I recall telling myself. There, the adventure/passion/love affair begins.”

 Joseph, as he explains, stresses making food from scratch – a rarity in our age of high fructose corn syrup-preserved ingredients. “I aim for simplicity with elegance while always using what’s fresh and local, incorporating only organic grown produce, free range meats and sustainable ingredients. I put a lot of respect and understanding in each ingredient making sure the dish is balanced and support each other intrinsic flavor. My preparation starts with an organized kitchen that includes a well structure culinary staff, daily meeting with my Sous Chefs, and checking with vendors and farmers for product availability.”

When visiting, you should try dishes like Herring under a Fur Coat, Lobster Versasia, Armenian Lamb Rack & Filet Duo, Fennel Dusted Muscovy Duck Breast with Honey Vodka Fondue, Day Boat Scallops with Orange Scented Vanilla Jus or the classic staple, Chicken Kiev!

“My method of preparation is Classical French. The steps and procedures always bring the best out of every dish, yet I will never use most of the ingredients as they used in the past. Nowadays, everything has to be lighter and healthier. FireBird is best known for its décor, collectable arts, rare Russian books, and mostly for being named after the famous Russian Ballet by the late Baroness Irina von der Launitz. My cooking is an art. My art at FireBird is not just for the food to look pretty on the plate, but to create a symphony of flavors in the mouth to enhance our guests’ overall Russian dining experience,” he writes.

“Our cuisine is best described as Russia without borders. The menu is designed to influence every surrounding corners of the old Soviet (which is now Russia). I focus on the well-known regions like Georgia, Armenia, Ukraine and the Baltics, and occasionally, I will add a not-well familiar region to the mix. Every dish is composed to surpass our guests’ expectations, while remaining authentic and true to the region and the dish itself.”

Although he serves up fine meat entrees, Joseph does not eat meat himself. “I’m a vegetarian. Most of my dishes (pork & shellfish), I’d never tasted. Yet, thru my research and continued studies, I fully understand the full aspect and essence of any ingredient of which I intend to use; whether it’s variation of spices and herbs, meat, fish and game animals. I cook with the aspiration of guest satisfaction, not personal preference.”

Firebird is located in NYC on 365 West 46th Street. As a restaurant that will delight both picky NYC locals and tourists alike, you can study the menu before you go at FireBirdRestaurant.com.

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Foodies Rejoice! You Can Build Your Breakfast With This New Lego Waffle Maker

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Kickstarter

Finally an excuse to play with your food.

Breakfast is the most important meal of the day but maybe it can be the most fun too? Well there is a new kitchen gadget in the works that would definitely bring creativity to your morning routine. The Building Brick Waffle Maker turns ordinary waffle batter into interlocking building blocks so you can construct your own carb castle. The waffle maker makes 14 bricks at a time so there are plenty of pieces to play with. The company behind the maker also produces construction plates that make for the perfect base for your waffle creation.

Kickstarter

If you’re hankering for a waffle brick you might have to wait just a little bit longer sadly. The maker launched on Kickstarter with a goal of raising $7,500. At the time of writing this, the Kickstarter is up to a whopping $77,000! That’s a lot of legos! According to the site, pledging $50 will get you one waffle maker, $75 will get you one waffle maker and two construction plates, $95 will get you two waffle makers, and $100 will get you one waffle maker and four construction plates – all of which will be delivered in August 2020.

Maybe it’s time to Leggo the Eggo and start making waffle creations at home!

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Twitter User Figures Out Why Triscuits Are Called “Triscuits” And Minds Everywhere Are Blown

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Sometimes the internet answers a question you never even knew you had.

Nabisco invented Triscuits in 1900. They were granted a patent in 1902. Nabisco began producing Triscuits for mass consumption in 1903. Each wafer currently measures 1-3/4 inches square. There are currently dozens of different flavors of the popular wheat snack. While all of this information will make for perfect ice-breaker fun facts at your next dinner party, it doesn’t really provide information on why Trsicuits are called “Triscuits,” which truthfully I have never even thought about before. Until today that is.

Twitter user @SageBoggs asked a question that has shaken the social media platform to its very core. He asked “What does the word ‘Triscuit’ mean?” If you’re like me you probably read that and thought “well everyone knows it has something to do with a biscuit” and while that is correct, Alex Trebek would have you escorted off of  Jeopardy for an answer so incomplete. Luckily for us, @SageBoggs continues his Twitter thread providing a ton of snack facts but not before warning us to “buckle up.” And it definitely is a wild ride.

Originally, @SageBoggs thought the “Tri” in “Triscuits” could stand for three layers or three ingredients but when he asked Nabisco themselves he got a response saying that was incorrect. In that same official response, Nabisco said none of the records from the date of invention survived so they weren’t 100% sure about the origin of the name either. WHAT?!? First mind explosion right there. After some more digging, @SageBoggs discovers one of the earliest ads for “Triscuits” features the slogan “baked by electricity,” which was a unique method of baking at the time. And then it hit him, the “Tri” in “Triscuits” comes from “elec-TRI-city.” They’re “electricity biscuits!” Mind blown all over again! Obviously Twitter erupted with comments, many of which express gratitude for answering a burning question we never knew we needed answer.

Take a look at the educational thread below!

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Get Hyped Over This DIY ‘Whipped Coffee’ Food Trend

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You’re still drinking regular, old, liquid coffee? How 2019 of you.

Coffee has been a staple to mankind ever since someone figured out that drinking the hot water poured over ground beans actually made mornings bearable. Since then, coffee has become woven into our culture. Coffee shops have popped up on every corner. There are about a bajillion different ways to have your coffee now too. You can have it hot or iced or frapped or latte’d or macchiato’d or espresso’d. You can have it with milk, without milk, with almond milk, coconut milk, oat milk…I bet you’re wishing I had less coffee while writing this huh? Well there is a new way for coffee lovers to enjoy their cup of joe and it is a piping hot new trend!

Whipped coffee has been popping up on Tik Tok over the last few weeks gaining a lot of attention from users. The airy coffee confectionary had a lot of people wondering how it’s made. Turns out, it’s not that complicated. One Tik Tok user, @JessicaInTheKitchen, broke down her recipe and demonstrated the simple process. Jessica’s recipe is as follows:

  • 2 tablespoons instant coffee
  • 2 tablespoons granulated sugar
  • 2 tablespoons boiling water
  • a pinch of cinnamon optional
  • 1 cup milk of choice

And then just like Devo said in 1980….you whip it, whip it real good. Take a look at the how-to video below and hop on this coffee trend before some giant, Seattle-based, coffee company has you paying $12 for a cup next month!

 

@jessicainthekitchenrecipe by @imhannahcho this SO good 😍 10/10 recommend ##veganrecipe ##tiktokreviews ##boredathome ##whatieatinaday ##plantbaseddiet ##whippedcoffee ##recipe♬ Supalonely (feat. Gus Dapperton) – BENEE

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